Добредојдовте
  • Users with e-mails at mail ·ru, aol ·com and gmx ·com to contact admins for registration.
  • Новорегистрираните членови повратниот одговор од форумот за активирање на сметката нека го побараат и во Junk на нивните пошти.
  • Сите регистрирани членови кои неучествуваат во дискусиите три месеци автоматски им се брише регистрацијата

 

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
МАКЕДОНИЈА ОТВОРЕНА ДА ГО ПРОМЕНИ ИМЕТО ??
Author Message
ЈорданПетровски Online
ЈорданПетровски-ЦРНИ
*****

Posts: 13,810
Joined: Mar 2010
Reputation: 36
#1

Quote: Macedonia open to changing its name to end 24-year dispute with Greece

Skopje says it is ready to discuss changing country’s name, which Athens feels was stolen from northern Greek province
[/url]
[Image: 1968.jpg?w=300&q=85&auto=format&sharp=10...edec79cfa3]
THEGUARDIAN
Macedonia’s PM, Nikola Gruevski, said: ‘We are ready to discuss, to open dialogue with them, and to find some solution.’ Photograph: Boris Grdanoski/AP
[url=http://www.theguardian.com/profile/helenasmith]Helena Smith in Athens and Patrick Kingsley

Wednesday 16 December 2015 09.49 GMT Last modified on Wednesday 16 December 2015 10.54 GMT

The Macedonian prime minister says he would be open to changing his country’s name, raising hopes of an end to one of the world’s most unusual diplomatic spats – a 24-year linguistic dispute with Greece.
At its founding in 1991, when it declared independence from Yugoslavia, the country formally referred to itself as the Republic of Macedonia – to the fury of many Greeks, who feel that their northern neighbours stole the name from the eponymous Greek province that lies directly to the south of the Macedonian-Greek border.
Now the Macedonian prime minister, Nikola Gruevski, says he is willing to reopen dialogue on the issue with Greece – providing that any potential name-change is put to a plebiscite in Macedonia. “We are ready to discuss, to open dialogue with them, and to find some solution,” Gruevski said in an interview with the Guardian.
[Image: Alexander-the-Great-007.jpg?w=460&q=85&a...5395062171]
Alexander the Great claimed by both sides in battle over name of Macedonia

Read more
Greece has long accused Macedonia of appropriating significant aspects of Hellenic culture in order to build the national identity of a predominantly Slavic state, not least the sun symbol that inspired the Macedonian flag, and the ancient hero, Alexander the Great, after whom the main Macedonian airport is named.
The dispute prompted Greece to block its neighbour from joining both Nato and EU, and led the UN to refer to Macedonia as the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia until the disagreement is resolved. Mooted name-changes have included adding qualifying words such as “upper” or “new” to Macedonia’s formal description – but no alteration has ever been agreed.
After years of intransigence on both sides, Macedonia’s leader has now implied he may be prepared to cede further ground to Greece, nearly two-and-a-half decades after the dispute first began in the aftermath of the breakup of Yugoslavia.
Advertisement
“We would like as soon as possible to go to dialogue with Greece to find a solution, and if we find a solution we have to go to the citizens and organise a referendum,” said Gruevski. “Through dialogue we have to find some solution, and after that to ask the citizens: is this right or not right?”
On both sides, there are other signals that the long-running dispute could be solved. Ahead of a visit to Athens on Thursday, Skopje’s foreign minister, Nikola Poposki, voiced optimism, telling the leading Greek daily, Kathimerini, that “conditions are more than ripe” for the name row to be resolved.
The visit, the first in 15 years, suggests that with Greece on its knees economically and Europe’s refugee crisis engulfing both, the Balkan neighbours are finally laying the ground for compromise.
Confidence-building measures have helped improve ties. Ending an 11-year embargo with a visit to Skopje in June, the Greek foreign minister, Nikos Kotzias, declared: “We want all our neighbours to be members of the European Union … because our own country, to great degree, is dependent on what happens in the Balkans as a whole.”
Prominent members of Alexis Tsipras’s leftist government have long indicated they would prefer to be shot of a problem blamed squarely on rightwing nationalism.
Fears in Athens of territorial aggression against the adjacent Greek province of Macedonia – stoked by what was perceived as the tiny republic’s exclusive claim to the name – have faded with time.
Having previously been adamant that no nomenclature would include the word Macedonia, Athens announced in 2007 that it would give its consent to a composite name in which it could feature. The statelet continued to insist that it be known as the Republic of Macedonia.
“We have gone the extra mile,” said one senior Greek foreign ministry source. “We’ve proposed a composite name with geographical qualifications for all uses.”
The issue will dominate Thursday’s talks. An immediate breakthrough is excluded. But Poposki’s visit – and the need to address other more pressing issues – may well augur the beginning of the end of one of the world’s quirkiest diplomatic disputes.



Quote:Гардијан: Македонија спремна да разговара за промена на името


Декември 16, 2015 Македонија Редакција Емагазин
 0
[Image: yuomn.jpg]
Скопје вели дека е спремно да разговара за промена на името на државата, за кое Атина смета дека е украдено од северната грчка провинција, објавува денес Гардијан.
Македонскиот премиер вели дека е спремен за промена на името на својата земја, со што ја зголеми надежта дека ќе му се стави крај на еден од најневообичаените дипломатски расправии во светот - 24-годишниот јазичен спор со Грција, вели весникот.
„По нејзиното основање во 1991 година, кога прогласи независност од Југославија, земјата официјално се нарече Република Македонија - предизвикувајќи бес кај многу Грци, кои чувствуваат дека нивните северни соседи го украле името од истоимената грчка провинција веднаш под македонско-грчката граница.
Сега македонскиот премиер, Никола Груевски, вели дека е спремен повторно да почне дијалог за прашањето со Грција - и дека за секоја потенцијална промена на името би се одржал референдум во Македонија„, пишува весникот.
„Ние сме подготвени да разговараме, да почнеме дијалог со нив, и да се најде некакво решение“, рекол Груевски во интервју за Гардијан.
„По неколкуте години непопустливост на двете страни, лидерот на Македонија сега укажа дека можеби е спремен да ѝ попушти на Грција“, вели Гардијан.
„Ние би сакале што е можно побрзо да покренеме дијалог со Грција за наоѓање решение, а ако најдеме решение, треба да им се обратиме на граѓаните и да организираме референдум“, рекол Груевски.
„Преку дијалогот ние мора да најдеме некакво решение, и потоа да ги прашаме граѓаните: дали ова е во ред или не?“, рекол Груевски.



Quote:Груевски: Насловот на статијата на „Гардијан“ е новинарски коментар, а не моја изјава

-Такво нешто не сум изјавил. И ние ќе реагираме и до „Гардијан“, се вели во писмена изјава на премиерот Никола Груевски во врска со неточните интерпретации на насловот (статијата) на „Гардијан“, „Македонија отворена да го промени името за да се стави крај на 24-годишниот спор со Грција“.
16 декември 2015



[Image: gruevski-profilna-640x427.jpg]
-Такво нешто не сум изјавил. И ние ќе реагираме и до „Гардијан“. Тоа се гледа и од самиот текст каде што е очигледно дека се работи за новинарски коментар, а не за моја изјава. Тоа е кристално јасно. Вакви провокации имало и ќе има и ние сме навикнати на тоа. Очигледно темата за името станува популарна периодов точно како што претпоставувавме и вакви тенденциозни и погрешни интерпретации од многуммина кои не му сакаат добро на процесот и имаат потреба од лажен ексклузивитет или одработуваат нечија агенда се очекувани, стои во писмената изјава на Груевски.
Имено, во статијата со наслов „Македонија отворена да го промени името за да се стави крај на 24-годишниот спор со Грција“, „Гардијан“ пишува „македонскиот премиер Никола Груевски вели дека е отворен за промена на името на неговата земја, со што ги подгреа надежите за крај на еден од нејнеобичните дипломатски спорови во светот“.
Сепак, во изјавата пренесена од македонскиот премиер, никаде не се вели тоа, односно Груевски изјавува дека Македонија е подготвена да разговара за да се најде некакво решение, за кое потоа ќе бидат прашани граѓаните, дали е тоа правилно или не.

[Image: gardijan-imeto.jpg]
– Подготвени сме да разговараме, да започнеме дијалог со нив, и да најдеме некакво решение. Сакаме колку што е можно побрзо да започнеме дијалог со Грција за изнаоѓање решение, и доколку најдеме решение потоа сакаме да им се обратиме на граѓаните и да организираме референдум. Преку разговор мораме да најдеме некакво решение, и потоа да ги прашаме граѓаните: дали е ова правилно или не е? – вели Груевски во изјавата пренесена од „Гардијан“.


KURIR



Болдираното од мене во текстот на КУРИР го потврдува онаа што е напишано од Гардијан а тоа е дека Груевски дал согласност за смена на името.
(This post was last modified: 16-12-2015, 02:55 PM by ЈорданПетровски.)
16-12-2015, 02:17 PM
Reply
ЈорданПетровски Online
ЈорданПетровски-ЦРНИ
*****

Posts: 13,810
Joined: Mar 2010
Reputation: 36
#2

Quote:Macedonian PM open to dialogue on name dispute to end 24-year row with Greece

Nikola Gruevski says he is ready to discuss changing country’s name, which Athens feels was stolen from northern Greek province

[/url]
[Image: 2992.jpg?w=300&q=85&auto=format&sharp=10...8b6f7cb54d]

Macedonia’s PM, Nikola Gruevski, said: ‘We are ready to discuss, to open dialogue with them, and to find some solution.’ Photograph: Ognen Teofilovski/Reuters
Helena Smith in Athens, and Patrick Kingsley
Wednesday 16 December 2015 09.49 GMT Last modified on Wednesday 16 December 2015 16.57 GMT

The Macedonian prime minister says he would be open to changing his country’s name, raising hopes of an end to one of the world’s most unusual diplomatic spats – a 24-year linguistic dispute with Greece.
At its founding in 1991, when it declared independence from Yugoslavia, the country formally referred to itself as the Republic of Macedonia – to the fury of many Greeks, who feel that their northern neighbours stole the name from the eponymous Greek province that lies directly to the south of the Macedonian-Greek border.
Now the Macedonian prime minister, Nikola Gruevski, says he is willing to reopen dialogue on the issue with Greece – providing that any potential name-change is put to a plebiscite in Macedonia. “We are ready to discuss, to open dialogue with them, and to find some solution,” Gruevski said in an interview with the Guardian.
[Image: Alexander-the-Great-007.jpg?w=460&q=85&a...5395062171]
Alexander the Great claimed by both sides in battle over name of Macedonia

Read more

Greece has long accused Macedonia of appropriating significant aspects of Hellenic culture in order to build the national identity of a predominantly Slavic state, not least [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vergina_Sun]the sun symbol that inspired the Macedonian flag, and the ancient hero, Alexander the Great, after whom the main Macedonian airport is named.
The dispute prompted Greece to block its neighbour from joining both Nato and EU, and led the UN to refer to Macedonia as the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia until the disagreement is resolved. Mooted name-changes have included adding qualifying words such as “upper” or “new” to Macedonia’s formal description – but no alteration has ever been agreed.
After years of intransigence on both sides, Macedonia’s leader has now implied he may be prepared to cede further ground to Greece, nearly two-and-a-half decades after the dispute first began in the aftermath of the breakup of Yugoslavia.
Advertisement

“We would like as soon as possible to go to dialogue with Greece to find a solution, and if we find a solution we have to go to the citizens and organise a referendum,” said Gruevski. “Through dialogue we have to find some solution, and after that to ask the citizens: is this right or not right?”
On both sides, there are other signals that the long-running dispute could be solved. Ahead of a visit to Athens on Thursday, Skopje’s foreign minister, Nikola Poposki, voiced optimism, telling the leading Greek daily, Kathimerini, that “conditions are more than ripe” for the name row to be resolved.
The visit, the first in 15 years, suggests that with Greece on its knees economically and Europe’s refugee crisis engulfing both, the Balkan neighbours are finally laying the ground for compromise.
Confidence-building measures have helped improve ties. Ending an 11-year embargo with a visit to Skopje in June, the Greek foreign minister, Nikos Kotzias, declared: “We want all our neighbours to be members of the European Union … because our own country, to great degree, is dependent on what happens in the Balkans as a whole.”
Prominent members of Alexis Tsipras’s leftist government have long indicated they would prefer to be shot of a problem blamed squarely on rightwing nationalism.
Fears in Athens of territorial aggression against the adjacent Greek province of Macedonia – stoked by what was perceived as the tiny republic’s exclusive claim to the name – have faded with time.
Having previously been adamant that no nomenclature would include the word Macedonia, Athens announced in 2007 that it would give its consent to a composite name in which it could feature. The statelet continued to insist that it be known as the Republic of Macedonia.
“We have gone the extra mile,” said one senior Greek foreign ministry source. “We’ve proposed a composite name with geographical qualifications for all uses.”
The issue will dominate Thursday’s talks. An immediate breakthrough is excluded. But Poposki’s visit – and the need to address other more pressing issues – may well augur the beginning of the end of one of the world’s quirkiest diplomatic disputes.





По реакцијата на премиерот Никола Груевски на интервјуто во „Гардијан“, британскиот весник го смени насловот!!
16-12-2015, 07:52 PM
Reply