Добредојдовте
  • Users with e-mails at mail ·ru, aol ·com and gmx ·com to contact admins for registration.
  • Новорегистрираните членови повратниот одговор од форумот за активирање на сметката нека го побараат и во Junk на нивните пошти.
  • Сите регистрирани членови кои неучествуваат во дискусиите три месеци автоматски им се брише регистрацијата

 

Thread Rating:
  • 7 Vote(s) - 4 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
В Македония не са живеле антични македонци, а пайноци
Author Message
veritas Offline
Posting Freak
*****

Posts: 1,691
Joined: Feb 2010
Reputation: 7

(10-11-2010, 08:48 PM)Taridin Wrote: Odi na temata za Kuber. Tamu ti go imam poka\ano dokumentot za Kuber. Ako Kuber bil Bugarin, narodot koj go vodel bil hristijanski romejski narod od Makedonija i Trakija.

Dosta so glupavi propagandi.
Kuberovi Bugari NEMA!!!

IMA BUGARIN kUBER I BUGARIN MAVAR, DA IMALO I USTE NEKOLKU, AMA NARODOT BIL MAKEDONSKI I TRAKISKI, A I PO ZAGOVOROT SI OTISLE LUGETO PO RODNITE MESTA.

Археологическите находки на македонският археолог Иван Микулчик показват, че това е била прабългарска култура. Оди в библиотеката да прочетеш неговата книга. Пък и всички византийски хорнисти и световно известни учени твърдят, че бил българин. Ебре и Кубер ли ще помакедончите!?

Средновековни градови и тврдини во Македонија
Иван Микулчиќ (1996)

http://www.promacedonia.org/im3/index.html
10-11-2010, 09:11 PM
Reply
Oxonian Offline
Кънѧзь
****

Posts: 402
Joined: Aug 2010
Reputation: 18

Considering the relief there is substantial ground to suppose that the name "The lower Ohrid lands" ("Dolnaja zemja Ohridska"), occuring in the marginal notes to the Chronicle of Manasses, describing events during the reign of Emperor Anastasius (491-517), refers exactly to the Ersek, Dolna Prespa and Korcha valley (Devol). Why do we draw attention to these details? Because the Chronicle of Manasses namely speaks of Dolnaja zemja Ohridska, as a territory of the first lasting settlement of the Bulgarian Slavs and the Kotragoi, as well as their military and political stabilization during the 6th c. (after 495, 507 and in particular after 586). Here are the marginal notes in the Chronicle of Manasses:

In the reign of Tzar Anastasius
the Bulgarians began to take these lands
and gradually began to build a home (country),
as far as the Ohrid lands, and afterwards
they conquered all the Ohrid lands

Werner's study, P. Lemerl's research and V. Popovic's studies lead to the conviction, that these objects, which make up the oldest and largest collection related with the state of the "Pseudo Obrai", i.e. the Panonian-Illyrian Bulgarian Kotragoi, were made in a Bulgarian state, so far overlooked by historians - the state of Berzitia. The supposition is that this country included the territory between the Vardar river and the Adriatic, to the west, with the exception of the Byzantine fortified towns of Thessalonike and Dures (the Medieval Dyrrachium). To the south this state reached the Pind mountains, and to the north up to the Lim river, a tributary of the Drina. The valuable treasure found at Vrap, which is, above all, evidence of the culture of this forgotten Bulgarian state are kept, as we already mentioned, at the Metropolitan Museum of Arts in New York, while those from Erseka, and exhibited at the Sotheby Gallery are in an unknown private collection.


[...]

This early settlement of Bulgarians was the reason Macedonia and Epirus, i.e. "Illyrian Bulgaria", to be called Old Bulgaria in the 11th century; as compared to Moesian Bulgaria (Bulgaria with the capital of Pliska). All this gives us good ground to look for the beginnings of the Western Bulgarian state Berzitia not in 680, when Kuber came from Srem in Western Macedonia, rather almost two centuries earlier, i.e. in 495 with the "taking" of the "Lower Ohrid Land" by Dragon, the Bulgarian.

[...]

Namely this is mentioned by the cosmographer from Ravena (end of the 6th c.):

"Inter vero Thraciam vel Macedoniam et Mysiam inferiorem modo Bulgari habitant qui ex supra scripta majore Scythia egresi sunt" (Only Bulgarians, who came from the above mentioned Scythia inhabit Thrace and Macedonia and Lower Moesia).


http://groznijat.tripod.com/p_bulgar/milosh.html
***
"It drives forward... saturated with his sense of that gorgeous, raging, brilliant time in which an implacable golden demigod rammed Hellenism forever into history and legend." -Kirkus Reviews
10-11-2010, 10:14 PM
Reply
veritas Offline
Posting Freak
*****

Posts: 1,691
Joined: Feb 2010
Reputation: 7

Филип II Македон и Пеоните са били смъртни врагове, а не братя.

http://books.google.com/books?id=tI4-aoB...on&f=false

http://books.google.com/books?id=2JT_zty...on&f=false

http://books.google.com/books?id=8nMVlrk...on&f=false

http://books.google.com/books?id=B1443DZ...on&f=false

http://books.google.com/books?id=49rmZ7_...on&f=false

http://books.google.com/books?id=nZnPNmz...on&f=false



Филип V Македон изселва пеоните от днешна Р. Македония и заселва тази територия с тракийци и други варварски племена.

http://books.google.com/books?id=InyEqBV...on&f=false

Македонците според легендите произлизат от големият син на Звес (гръцки бог - баща на боговете и хората), който се наричал Македон.

http://books.google.com/books?id=YVPshBL...on&f=false

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeus#In_philosophy

Пеоните по времето на Филип II са населявали днешна Р. Македония

http://books.google.com/books?id=EZ08b32...&q&f=false

Античните македонци били гръцки племена.

http://books.google.com/books?id=-aFtPdh...&q&f=false
05-12-2010, 09:44 PM
Reply
jingiby Offline
Posting Freak
*****

Posts: 994
Joined: Aug 2010
Reputation: 15

Да, пеонците определено са били врагове на елиногласните македоноиди!Sepotsmeva
[Image: 03079b0284b1ec94.jpg]
24-12-2010, 04:54 PM
Reply
veritas Offline
Posting Freak
*****

Posts: 1,691
Joined: Feb 2010
Reputation: 7

Ето я историята на гръцките дорийски племена, от които произхождат античните македонци.

DoriansFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search
This article is about the population of ancient Greece. For other uses, see Dorian (disambiguation).
The Dorians (Greek: Δωριεῖς, Dōrieis, singular Δωριεύς, Dōrieus) were one of the four major tribes into which the Ancient Greeks of the Classical period divided themselves.[1]

The Dorians are almost always simply referenced as just "the Dorians", as they are in the earliest literary mention of them in Odyssey,[2] where they already can be found inhabiting the island of Crete. Herodotus does use the word ethnos[3] with regard to them, from which the English word ethnic derives, which appears in the modern concept of ethnic group. It has to be clarified though, that in the ancient Greek language ethnos by no means can be translated as 'nation' alone, but rather as 'tribe', 'race' or 'people'. The Dorians are clearly among the peoples regarded as Hellenes. They were diverse in way of life and social organization, varying from the populous trade center of the city of Corinth, known for its ornate style in art and architecture, to the isolationist, military state of Lacedaemon or Sparta. However, peoples belonging to the same tribe, the Dorians, as well as the Aeolians and the Ionians, were further subdivided in independent groups often hostile to each other, usually named after the location of their state.

And yet all Hellenes knew what localities were Dorian and what not. Dorian states at war could more likely than not (but not always) count on the assistance of other Dorian states. Dorians were distinguished by the Doric Greek dialect and by characteristic social and historical traditions. Accounts vary as to their place of origin. One theory widely believed in ancient times, but never proven beyond doubt, is that they originated in the north, north-eastern mountainous regions of Greece, ancient Macedonia and Epirus, whence obscure circumstances brought them south into the Peloponnese, to certain Aegean islands, Magna Graecia, Lapithos and Crete. Another theory is that they originated from Asia Minor, and that they either immigrated through the northeast of Greece and settled in southern Greece or immigrated from the coast of western Asian Minor into the Aegean islands and into southern Greece. Either way, mythology gave them a Greek origin and eponymous founder, Dorus son of Hellen, the mythological patriarch of the Hellenes.

In the 5th century BC, Dorians and Ionians were the two most politically important Greek ethne, whose ultimate clash resulted in the Peloponnesian War. The degree to which fifth-century Hellenes self-identified as "Ionian" or "Dorian" has itself been disputed.[4] The fifth- and fourth-century literary tradition through which moderns view these ethnic identifications was profoundly influenced by the social politics of the time. Also, according to E.N. Tigerstedt, nineteenth-century European admirers of virtues they considered "Dorian" identified themselves as "Laconophile" and found responsive parallels in the culture of their day as well; their biases contribute to the traditional modern interpretation of "Dorians".[5]

Distinctions of languageMain article: Doric Greek
People who spoke the Doric dialect lived along the coast of the Peloponnese, in Crete, southwest Asia Minor, various cities of Southern Italy and Sicily, all of which adds weight to the theory of Asia Minor as the origin of the Dorians. Numerous historians link Doric, North-Western Greek and Ancient Macedonian. In later periods other dialects predominated, most notably the Attic, upon which the Koine or common Greek language of the Hellenistic period was based. The main characteristic of Doric was the preservation of Indo-European [aː], long ‹α›, which in Attic-Ionic became [ɛː], ‹η›. Tsakonian Greek, a descendant of Doric Greek and source of great interest to linguists, is extraordinarily still spoken in some regions of the Southern Argolid coast of the Peloponnese, on the coast of the modern prefecture of Arcadia.

Herodotus mentions that the "people now called the Dorians" were neighbors of the Pelasgians.[16] The women had a distinctive dress, he said, a tunic (plain dress) not needing to be pinned with brooches.[17]

Although the one nation nowhere yet went out, the Lacedaemonian was very much wandering. For, in the time of King Deucalion, it was settled in the land of Phthia, and in the time of Dorus, the son of Hellen, in the country under Ossa and Olympus, the so-called Histiaean. From the Histiaean, after it had been expelled by the Cadmeians, it was settled in Pindus called Macedonian. Thence again it changed its place to the Dryopian land, and from the Dryopian thus it came to Peloponnesus, and was called Doric.” (Herodot, Book I, 56.3).
Thus, according to Herodotus, the Dorians did not acquire their name until they had reached Peloponnesus.

Herodotus' list of Dorian states is as follows. From northeastern Greece were Phthia, Histiaea and Macedon. In central Greece were Doris (the former Dryopia) and in the south Peloponnesus,[19] specifically the states of Lacedaemon, Corinth, Sicyon, Epidaurus, Troezen and Hermione.[20] Overseas were the islands of Rhodes, Cos, Nisyrus and the Anatolian cities of Cnidus, Halicarnassus, Phaselis and Calydna
.[21] Dorians also colonised Crete including founding of such towns as Lato, Dreros and Olous.[22] The Cynurians were originally Ionians but had become Dorian under the influence of their Argive masters.[23]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorians
01-01-2011, 08:56 PM
Reply
veritas Offline
Posting Freak
*****

Posts: 1,691
Joined: Feb 2010
Reputation: 7

Encyclopedia of the ancient Greek world By David Sacks, Oswyn Murray, Lisa R. Brody

Macedon was inhabited by various peoples of Dorian-Greek, Illyrian, and Thracian descent, who spoke a Greek dialect and worshipped Greek gods. Prior to the mid-400s BCE . Macedon was a mere backwater, beleaguered by hostile Illyrians to ...

http://books.google.com/books?id=yyrao0d...an&f=false


12-01-2011, 06:55 AM
Reply
Misla
Unregistered

 

"During the 1794-1841 period, at least 14 intelectuals (among whom were prominent figures such as Panagiotis Kordikas, Adamantios Korais, Alexandros Soutsos, Georgios Kozakis-Tipaldos, and Iakovos Rizos-Nerulos) expressed the oppinion that the ancient Macedonians were NOT part of the ancient Greek world (Politis 1993, 40-2; Dimitrakopoulos 1996).

The Macedonians were considered CONQUERORS of ancient Greece, the first of a series of invaders that kept the region under their rule for more than two millenia."

"Nationalism, Globalization and Orthodoxy: The Social Origins of Ethnic Conflict in the Balkans" (Contributions to the Study of World History), Victor Roudometof, p.102"

[Image: 168413_1523591337583_1468610868_31124276_1188565_n.jpg]
15-01-2011, 07:39 AM
Reply
Playboytaxi Offline
Senior Member
****

Posts: 614
Joined: Jun 2010
Reputation: 24

A pa jas gledam drugo pishe v poveketo knigi:

[Image: P4200857.JPG]

[Image: P4200859.JPG]

[Image: P4200865.JPG]

[Image: P4200867.JPG]

[Image: P4200871.JPG]

[Image: TheWorldOfClasGreece.JPG]

[Image: TheCompTimeOfMilHist.JPG]


I sho pravime sega??? Toja Aleksandar ako ne bil grk,togava bil grkoman,a sega nie ke go slavime kako prv makedonec.Se_klanjam











My Blog with hundreds of original VMRO and other old documents related to Macedonia:
http://macedoniandocuments.blogspot.com/...lchev.html



15-01-2011, 08:04 AM
Website Reply
Misla
Unregistered

 





The Making of Modern Greece by R Beaton & D Ricks

Ioannis Koubourlis

Paparrigopulos, the man who has created Greece national history thought that the ancient Macedonians were a distinct nation of their own.


[Image: beaton.png]

[Image: beaton59.png]

[Image: beaton60.png]

[Image: beaton182.png]
[Image: beaton182a.png]


The nation and its ruins by Yannis Hamilakis page 112.

[Image: rizo112.png]

"Greece the modern sequel from1821 to the present" by J. Kolioupolos & T. Veremis

[Image: veremes.png]
[Image: veremes245.png]
[Image: veremes246.png]

[Image: veremes334.png]
[Image: Veremisfootnote.jpg]


Language and national identity in Greece 1776-1976 by Peter Mackridge

[Image: petemack.png]
[Image: mackridge181.png]
[Image: mackridge181a.png]
[Image: mackridge182.png]
[Image: mackridge182a.png]
[Image: PeterMackrdige47.jpg]

Political Uses of the Past

[Image: Usesofthepast.jpg]
[Image: Usesofthepast30.jpg]
15-01-2011, 08:53 AM
Reply
афион Offline
Posting Freak
*****

Posts: 2,509
Joined: Mar 2010
Reputation: 3

Гркоманчето се радува оти аце бил грк Icon_razz

А замисли бугарите аце го сметале за бугарин !!!!

Каснаковски прибери ги децата ја посерија работата.
Низ срцето на Македонија тече Вардар,а не Дунав...Нашиот бисер е Охрид, а не Јадран...Нашето наследство се патриотските песни, а не ТВ Пинк...Јас навивам за ПЕЛИСТЕР, а не за Ѕвезда...Слобода ми донесе мојот дедо,а не КПЈ...Македонија ја создаде Господ,а не Тито...МАКЕДОНИЈА е вечна, а Југославија е мртва!!

Makedonija


http://macedoniahistorydocuments.blogspo...-post.html
15-01-2011, 10:41 AM
Reply
veritas Offline
Posting Freak
*****

Posts: 1,691
Joined: Feb 2010
Reputation: 7

(15-01-2011, 10:41 AM)афион Wrote: Гркоманчето се радува оти аце бил грк Icon_razz

А замисли бугарите аце го сметале за бугарин !!!!

Каснаковски прибери ги децата ја посерија работата.

Кой какво сметал нема значение, важното е какво казват историците. А техните мнения наистина са разделени. Едни смятат, че античните македонци са били наследници на гръцките дорийски племена както е писал Херодот. Други че са били илири или траки.

http://books.google.com/books?id=Vm03AAA...ns&f=false
http://books.google.com/books?id=7KsrAAA...&q&f=false
http://books.google.com/books?id=3hs9AAA...us&f=false
http://www.google.com/search?tbs=bks:1&t...arch+Books

15-01-2011, 11:09 AM
Reply
veritas Offline
Posting Freak
*****

Posts: 1,691
Joined: Feb 2010
Reputation: 7

Ето още търсения за античките македонци.

http://www.google.com/search?tbs=bks:1&t...fafcb0c911
http://www.google.com/search?tbs=bks:1&t...arch+Books
(This post was last modified: 15-01-2011, 11:17 AM by veritas.)
15-01-2011, 11:15 AM
Reply
афион Offline
Posting Freak
*****

Posts: 2,509
Joined: Mar 2010
Reputation: 3

Дали си свесен колку пати истите постови ги покажуваш???
Побарај ја книгата „Македонскиот империјализам„ од Елиот па научи нешто гркоманче.
Низ срцето на Македонија тече Вардар,а не Дунав...Нашиот бисер е Охрид, а не Јадран...Нашето наследство се патриотските песни, а не ТВ Пинк...Јас навивам за ПЕЛИСТЕР, а не за Ѕвезда...Слобода ми донесе мојот дедо,а не КПЈ...Македонија ја создаде Господ,а не Тито...МАКЕДОНИЈА е вечна, а Југославија е мртва!!

Makedonija


http://macedoniahistorydocuments.blogspo...-post.html
15-01-2011, 12:13 PM
Reply
veritas Offline
Posting Freak
*****

Posts: 1,691
Joined: Feb 2010
Reputation: 7

(15-01-2011, 12:13 PM)афион Wrote: Дали си свесен колку пати истите постови ги покажуваш???
Побарај ја книгата „Македонскиот империјализам„ од Елиот па научи нешто гркоманче.

Аз ти показвам 1000 книги, ти ми говориш за една.
15-01-2011, 12:31 PM
Reply
афион Offline
Posting Freak
*****

Posts: 2,509
Joined: Mar 2010
Reputation: 3

Твоите милон книги невредат колку таа една.
Низ срцето на Македонија тече Вардар,а не Дунав...Нашиот бисер е Охрид, а не Јадран...Нашето наследство се патриотските песни, а не ТВ Пинк...Јас навивам за ПЕЛИСТЕР, а не за Ѕвезда...Слобода ми донесе мојот дедо,а не КПЈ...Македонија ја создаде Господ,а не Тито...МАКЕДОНИЈА е вечна, а Југославија е мртва!!

Makedonija


http://macedoniahistorydocuments.blogspo...-post.html
15-01-2011, 12:45 PM
Reply
veritas Offline
Posting Freak
*****

Posts: 1,691
Joined: Feb 2010
Reputation: 7

(15-01-2011, 12:45 PM)афион Wrote: Твоите милон книги невредат колку таа една.

И това ли не вреди?

Писмо на меѓународна група од 200 академици до Барак Обама против Псевдомакедонизмот на БЈРМ
Posted on May 21, 2009
by vardaraxios| Leave a comment
18 Maj 2009

Уважен Барак Обама,
Претседател, Соединети Американски Држави
Бела Куќа
1600 Авенија Пенсилванија NW
Вашингтон, ОК 20500

Ние, долупотпишаните професори на грчко-римската древност, учтиво побаруваме да интервенирате да се исчисти дел од историјскиот смет оставен во југоисточна Европа од претходната администрација на САД.

На Ноември 4ти 2004, два дена пред повторниот избор на Председателот Џорџ В. Буш, неговата администрација унилатерално ја призна “Република Македонија“. Оваа акција не само што ги видоизмени географските и историјските факти, туку ослободи опасна епидемија на историјски ревизионизам, од кој најочебијните симптоми се присвојувањето од владата во Скопје на најпознатиот Македонец, Александар Велики.

Ние веруваме дека оваа глупост отиде предалеку и дека САД немаат работа да подржуваат субверзија на историјата. Ајде да ги прегледаме фактите. (документација за овие факти може да се најде прикрепена и на http://macedonia-evidence.org/documentation.html)

Земјата за која станува збор, со Скопје како современ главен град, беше наречена Пајонија во древноста. Пл. Барнос и Орбелос (кои ги оформуваат денес северните меѓи на Грција) обезбедуваат природна бариера која ги одделувала и ги одделува Македонија од нејзиниот северен сосед. Единствена вистинска врска е преку реката Аксиос, Вардар и дури оваа долина не оформува линија на комуникација бидејќи е поделена со клисури.
Иако е точно дека Пајонците биле потчинети од Филип Втори, таткото на Александар, во 358 г. п.н.е., тие не беа Македонци и не живееа во Македонија. Исто така, на пример, Египтјаните, кои беа потчинети од Александар, беа владеени од Македонците, вклучително и од фамозната Клеопатра, но тие никогаш не беа самите Македонци, и Египет никогаш не бил нарекуван Македонија.

Попрво, Македонија и македонските Грци беа сместени за барем 2.500 години токму таму каде е современата грчка провинција Македонија. Точно истата релација е вистинска за Атика и атинските Грци, Аргос и аргоските Грци, Коринт и коринтските Грци, итн.

Ние не разбираме како современите жители на Пајонија, кои зборуваат словенски – јазик воведен на Балканот околу милениум по смртта на Александар – можат да го присвојуваат како нивен национален херој. Александар Велики бил целосно и неоспорно Грк. Неговиот пра-пра-прадедо, Александар Први, се натпреварувал на Олимписките игри каде учеството беше ограничено на Грци.

Дури пред Александар Први, Македонците го лоцираа своето потекло во Аргос, и многу од нивните кралеви ја користеа главата на Херкул – суштествениот грчки херој – на нивните монети

Еврипид – кој умрел и бил погребан во Македонија – ја напиша својата пиеса Архелај во чест на прастрикото на Александар, и на грчки. Додека бил во Македонија, Еврипид исто ја напиша Бахаи, повторно на грчки. По презумпција, македонската публика можеше да разбере што напишал и тоа што го слушале.

Татко му на Александар, Филип, добил неколку коњанички победи во Олимпија и Делфи, двете најхеленски од сите светилишта во древна Грција каде на Негрците не им беше дозволено да се натпреваруваат. Уште позначајно, Филип беше назначен да ги раководи Питијските игри на Делфи во 346. г.п.н.е. Со други зборови, татко му на Александар Велики и неговите предци беа целосно Грци. Грчкиот беше јазик ползуван од Демостен и неговата делагација од Атина кога му упатија посети на Филип, исто така во 346 г.п.н.е. Уште еден северен Грк, Аристотел, отиде да студира за скоро 20 години во академијата на Платон. Аристотел последователно се вратил во Македонија и станал тутор на Александар Трети. Тие ползувале грчки во нивната училница која се уште може да се види близу Науса во Македонија.

Александар го носел со себе низ своите освојувања Аристотеловото издание на Хомеровата “Илијада“. Александар исто така ги ширел грчкиот јазик и култура низ неговата империја, основајќи градови и востанувајќи центри за учење. Оттаму натписи кои се однeсуваат на такви типични грчки институции како што е гимназиумот се наоѓаат дури во Афганистан. Сите тие се напишани на грчки.

Се поставува прашањето: зошто грчкиот беше lingua franca преку целата Александрова империја ако тој бил “Македонец“? Зошто беше Новиот Завет, на пример, напишан на грчки?

Одговорите се јасни: Александар Велики беше Грк, а не Словен, и Словените и нивниот јазик не беа никаде блиску до Александар или неговата татковина се до 1.000 години подоцна. Ова не носи назад до географската област позната во древноста како Пајонија. Зошто луѓето кои живеат таму се нарекуваат себеси Македонци и нивната земја Македонија? Зошто тие зграпчуваат целосно грчка фигура и прават од него нивен национален херој?

Древните Пајонци можеби биле или можеби не биле Грци, но тие секако станаа грковидни, и тие никогаш не биле Словени. Тие исто така не биле Македонци. Античка Пајонија била дел од Македонската Империја. Исто тоа беа Јонија и Сирија и Палестина и Египет и Месопотамија и Вавилон и многу други. Така, тие можеби станаа “македонски“ привремено но ниту една од нив не беше “Македонија“. Кражбата на Филип и Александар од земја која никогаш не била Македонија не може да биде оправдано.

Традициите на древна Пајонија можат да бидат усвоени од сегашните жители на тоа географско подрачје со значително оправдување. Но издолжувањето на географскиот термин “Македонија“ да ја покрие јужна Југославија не е можно. Дури во доцниот 19. век, оваа злоупотреба имплицирала нездрави територијални аспирации.

Истата мотивација се гледа во школски мапи кои ја покажуваат псевдо-голема Македонија, протегнувајќи се од Скопје до пл. Олимп и со ознаки на словенски. Истата мапа и нејзините тврдења се на календари, налепници, банкноти итн., кои циркулираат во новата држава постојано од кога таа ја прогласи својата независност од Југославија во 1991. Зошто сиромашна земја без излез на море прави таков историјски нонсенс? Зошто безобразно го исмејува и провоцира својот сосед?

Како год некој да сака да го карактеризира таквото однесување, тоа јасно не е сила за историјска точност ниту за стабилност на Балканот. Тажно е што Соединетите Американски Држави го помогнаа и охрабрија таквото однесување. Ве повикуваме вас, г-не Претседател, да помогнете – на било кој начин кој го сметате за соодветен – на владата во Скопје да разбере дека не може да изгради национален идентитет на трошок на историјската вистина. Нашето заедничко меѓународно општество не може да преживее кога историја е игнорирана, уште помалку кога историјата е фабрикувана.

Искрено,

Harry C. Avery, Professor of Classics, University of Pittsburgh (USA)

Dr. Dirk Backendorf. Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Literatur Mainz (Germany)

Elizabeth C. Banks, Associate Professor of Classics (ret.), University of Kansas (USA)

Luigi Beschi, professore emerito di Archeologia Classica, Università di Firenze (Italy)

Josine H. Blok, professor of Ancient History and Classical Civilization, Utrecht University (The Netherlands)

Alan Boegehold, Emeritus Professor of Classics, Brown University (USA)

Efrosyni Boutsikas, Lecturer of Classical Archaeology, University of Kent (UK)

Keith Bradley, Eli J. and Helen Shaheen Professor of Classics, Concurrent Professor of History, University of Notre Dame (USA)

Stanley M. Burstein, Professor Emeritus, California State University, Los Angeles (USA)

Francis Cairns, Professor of Classical Languages, The Florida State University (USA)

John McK. Camp II, Agora Excavations and Professor of Archaeology, ASCSA, Athens (Greece)

Paul Cartledge, A.G. Leventis Professor of Greek Culture, University of Cambridge (UK)

Paavo Castrén, Professor of Classical Philology Emeritus, University of Helsinki (Finland)

William Cavanagh, Professor of Aegean Prehistory, University of Nottingham (UK)

Angelos Chaniotis, Professor, Senior Research Fellow, All Souls College, Oxford (UK)

Paul Christesen, Professor of Ancient Greek History, Dartmouth College (USA)

Ada Cohen, Associate Professor of Art History, Dartmouth College (USA)

Randall M. Colaizzi, Lecturer in Classical Studies, University of Massachusetts-Boston (USA)

Kathleen M. Coleman, Professor of Latin, Harvard University (USA)

Michael B. Cosmopoulos, Ph.D., Professor and Endowed Chair in Greek Archaeology, University of Missouri-St. Louis (USA)

Kevin F. Daly, Assistant Professor of Classics, Bucknell University (USA)

Wolfgang Decker, Professor emeritus of sport history, Deutsche Sporthochschule, Köln (Germany)

Luc Deitz, Ausserplanmässiger Professor of Mediaeval and Renaissance Latin, University of Trier (Germany), and Curator of manuscripts and rare books, National Library of Luxembourg (Luxembourg)

Michael Dewar, Professor of Classics, University of Toronto (Canada)

John D. Dillery, Associate Professor of Classics, University of Virginia (USA)

Sheila Dillon, Associate Professor, Depts. of Art, Art History & Visual Studies and Classical Studies, Duke University (USA)

Douglas Domingo-Forasté, Professor of Classics, California State University, Long Beach (USA)

Pierre Ducrey, professeur honoraire, Université de Lausanne (Switzerland)

Roger Dunkle, Professor of Classics Emeritus, Brooklyn College, City University of New York (USA)

Michael M. Eisman, Associate Professor Ancient History and Classical Archaeology, Department of History, Temple University (USA)

Mostafa El-Abbadi, Professor Emeritus, University of Alexandria (Egypt)

R. Malcolm Errington, Professor für Alte Geschichte (Emeritus) Philipps-Universität, Marburg (Germany)

Panagiotis Faklaris, Assistant Professor of Classical Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece)

Denis Feeney, Giger Professor of Latin, Princeton University (USA)

Elizabeth A. Fisher, Professor of Classics and Art History, Randolph-Macon College (USA)

Nick Fisher, Professor of Ancient History, Cardiff University (UK)

R. Leon Fitts, Asbury J Clarke Professor of Classical Studies, Emeritus, FSA, Scot., Dickinson Colllege (USA)

John M. Fossey FRSC, FSA, Emeritus Professor of Art History (and Archaeology), McGill Univertsity, Montreal, and Curator of Archaeology, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (Canada)

Robin Lane Fox, University Reader in Ancient History, New College, Oxford (UK)

Rainer Friedrich, Professor of Classics Emeritus, Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S. (Canada)

Heide Froning, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Marburg (Germany)

Peter Funke, Professor of Ancient History, University of Muenster (Germany)

Traianos Gagos, Professor of Greek and Papyrology, University of Michigan (USA)

Robert Garland, Roy D. and Margaret B. Wooster Professor of the Classics, Colgate University, Hamilton NY (USA)

Douglas E. Gerber, Professor Emeritus of Classical Studies, University of Western Ontario (Canada)

Hans R. Goette, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Giessen (Germany); German Archaeological Institute, Berlin (Germany)

Sander M. Goldberg, Professor of Classics, UCLA (USA)

Erich S. Gruen, Gladys Rehard Wood Professor of History and Classics, Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley (USA)

Christian Habicht, Professor of Ancient History, Emeritus, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton (USA)

Donald C. Haggis, Nicholas A. Cassas Term Professor of Greek Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA)

Judith P. Hallett, Professor of Classics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (USA)

Prof. Paul B. Harvey, Jr. Head, Department of Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, The Pennsylvania State University (USA)

Eleni Hasaki, Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Arizona (USA)

Miltiades B. Hatzopoulos, Director, Research Centre for Greek and Roman Antiquity, National Research Foundation, Athens (Greece)

Wolf-Dieter Heilmeyer, Prof. Dr., Freie Universität Berlin und Antikensammlung der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin (Germany)

Steven W. Hirsch, Associate Professor of Classics and History, Tufts University (USA)

Karl-J. Hölkeskamp, Professor of Ancient History, University of Cologne (Germany)

Frank L. Holt, Professor of Ancient History, University of Houston (USA)

Dan Hooley, Professor of Classics, University of Missouri (USA)

Meredith C. Hoppin, Gagliardi Professor of Classical Languages, Williams College, Williamstown, MA (USA)

Caroline M. Houser, Professor of Art History Emerita, Smith College (USA) and Affiliated Professor, University of Washington (USA)

Georgia Kafka, Visiting Professor of Modern Greek Language, Literature and History, University of New Brunswick (Canada)

Anthony Kaldellis, Professor of Greek and Latin, The Ohio State University (USA)

Andromache Karanika, Assistant Professor of Classics, University of California, Irvine (USA)

Robert A. Kaster, Professor of Classics and Kennedy Foundation Professor of Latin, Princeton University (USA)

Vassiliki Kekela, Adjunct Professor of Greek Studies, Classics Department, Hunter College, City University of New York (USA)

Dietmar Kienast, Professor Emeritus of Ancient History, University of Duesseldorf (Germany)

Karl Kilinski II, University Distinguished Teaching Professor, Southern Methodist University (USA)

Dr. Florian Knauss, associate director, Staatliche Antikensammlungen und Glyptothek Muenchen (Germany)

Denis Knoepfler, Professor of Greek Epigraphy and History, Collège de France (Paris)

Ortwin Knorr, Associate Professor of Classics, Willamette University (USA)

Robert B. Koehl, Professor of Archaeology, Department of Classical and Oriental Studies Hunter College, City University of New York (USA)

Georgia Kokkorou-Alevras, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Athens (Greece)

Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Classical Studies, Brandeis University (USA)

Eric J. Kondratieff, Assistant Professor of Classics and Ancient History, Department of Greek & Roman Classics, Temple University

Haritini Kotsidu, Apl. Prof. Dr. für Klassische Archäologie, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt/M. (Germany)

Lambrini Koutoussaki, Dr., Lecturer of Classical Archaeology, University of Zürich (Switzerland)

David Kovacs, Hugh H. Obear Professor of Classics, University of Virginia (USA)

Peter Krentz, W. R. Grey Professor of Classics and History, Davidson College (USA)

Friedrich Krinzinger, Professor of Classical Archaeology Emeritus, University of Vienna (Austria)

Michael Kumpf, Professor of Classics, Valparaiso University (USA)

Donald G. Kyle, Professor of History, University of Texas at Arlington (USA)

Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Helmut Kyrieleis, former president of the German Archaeological Institute, Berlin (Germany)

Gerald V. Lalonde, Benedict Professor of Classics, Grinnell College (USA)

Steven Lattimore, Professor Emeritus of Classics, University of California, Los Angeles (USA)

Francis M. Lazarus, President, University of Dallas (USA)

Mary R. Lefkowitz, Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities, Emerita, Wellesley College (USA)

Iphigeneia Leventi, Assistant Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Thessaly (Greece)

Daniel B. Levine, Professor of Classical Studies, University of Arkansas (USA)

Christina Leypold, Dr. phil., Archaeological Institute, University of Zurich (Switzerland)

Vayos Liapis, Associate Professor of Greek, Centre d’Études Classiques & Département de Philosophie, Université de Montréal (Canada)

Hugh Lloyd-Jones, Professor of Greek Emeritus, University of Oxford (UK)

Yannis Lolos, Assistant Professor, History, Archaeology, and Anthropology, University of Thessaly (Greece)

Stanley Lombardo, Professor of Classics, University of Kansas, USA

Anthony Long, Professor of Classics and Irving G. Stone Professor of Literature, University of California, Berkeley (USA)

Julia Lougovaya, Assistant Professor, Department of Classics, Columbia University (USA)

A.D. Macro, Hobart Professor of Classical Languages emeritus, Trinity College (USA)

John Magee, Professor, Department of Classics, Director, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto (Canada)

Dr. Christofilis Maggidis, Associate Professor of Archaeology, Dickinson College (USA)

Jeannette Marchand, Assistant Professor of Classics, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio (USA)

Richard P. Martin, Antony and Isabelle Raubitschek Professor in Classics, Stanford University

Maria Mavroudi, Professor of Byzantine History, University of California, Berkeley (USA)

Alexander Mazarakis Ainian, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Thessaly (Greece)

James R. McCredie, Sherman Fairchild Professor emeritus; Director, Excavations in Samothrace Institute of Fine Arts, New York University (USA)

James C. McKeown, Professor of Classics, University of Wisconsin-Madison (USA)

Robert A. Mechikoff, Professor and Life Member of the International Society of Olympic Historians, San Diego State University (USA)

Andreas Mehl, Professor of Ancient History, Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

Harald Mielsch, Professor of Classical Archeology, University of Bonn (Germany)

Stephen G. Miller, Professor of Classical Archaeology Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley (USA)

Phillip Mitsis, A.S. Onassis Professor of Classics and Philosophy, New York University (USA)

Peter Franz Mittag, Professor für Alte Geschichte, Universität zu Köln (Germany)

David Gordon Mitten, James Loeb Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology, Harvard University (USA)

Margaret S. Mook, Associate Professor of Classical Studies, Iowa State University (USA)

Anatole Mori, Associate Professor of Classical Studies, University of Missouri- Columbia (USA)

Jennifer Sheridan Moss, Associate Professor, Wayne State University (USA)

Ioannis Mylonopoulos, Assistant Professor of Greek Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University, New York (USA).

Richard Neudecker, PD of Classical Archaeology, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut Rom (Italy)

James M.L. Newhard, Associate Professor of Classics, College of Charleston (USA)

Carole E. Newlands, Professor of Classics, University of Wisconsin, Madison (USA)

John Maxwell O’Brien, Professor of History, Queens College, City University of New York (USA)

James J. O’Hara, Paddison Professor of Latin, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA)

Martin Ostwald, Professor of Classics (ret.), Swarthmore College and Professor of Classical Studies (ret.), University of Pennsylvania (USA)

Olga Palagia, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Athens (Greece)

Vassiliki Panoussi, Associate Professor of Classical Studies, The College of William and Mary (USA)

Maria C. Pantelia, Professor of Classics, University of California, Irvine (USA)

Pantos A.Pantos, Adjunct Faculty, Department of History, Archaeology and Social Anthropology, University of Thessaly (Greece)

Anthony J. Papalas, Professor of Ancient History, East Carolina University (USA)

Nassos Papalexandrou, Associate Professor, The University of Texas at Austin (USA)

Polyvia Parara, Visiting Assistant Professor of Greek Language and Civilization, Department of Classics, Georgetown University (USA)

Richard W. Parker, Associate Professor of Classics, Brock University (Canada)

Robert Parker, Wykeham Professor of Ancient History, New College, Oxford (UK)

Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi, Associate Professor of Classics, Stanford University (USA)

Jacques Perreault, Professor of Greek archaeology, Université de Montréal, Québec (Canada)

Yanis Pikoulas, Associate Professor of Ancient Greek History, University of Thessaly (Greece)

John Pollini, Professor of Classical Art & Archaeology, University of Southern California (USA)

David Potter, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Greek and Latin. The University of Michigan (USA)

Robert L. Pounder, Professor Emeritus of Classics, Vassar College (USA)

Nikolaos Poulopoulos, Assistant Professor in History and Chair in Modern Greek Studies, McGill University (Canada)

William H. Race, George L. Paddison Professor of Classics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA)

John T. Ramsey, Professor of Classics, University of Illinois at Chicago (USA)

Karl Reber, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Lausanne (Switzerland)

Rush Rehm, Professor of Classics and Drama, Stanford University (USA)

Werner Riess, Associate Professor of Classics, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA)

Robert H. Rivkin, Ancient Studies Department, University of Maryland Baltimore County (USA)

Barbara Saylor Rodgers, Professor of Classics, The University of Vermont (USA)

Robert H. Rodgers. Lyman-Roberts Professor of Classical Languages and Literature, University of Vermont (USA)

Nathan Rosenstein, Professor of Ancient History, The Ohio State University (USA)

John C. Rouman, Professor Emeritus of Classics, University of New Hampshire, (USA)

Dr. James Roy, Reader in Greek History (retired), University of Nottingham (UK)

Steven H. Rutledge, Associate Professor of Classics, Department of Classics, University of Maryland, College Park (USA)

Christina A. Salowey, Associate Professor of Classics, Hollins University (USA)

Guy D. R. Sanders, Resident Director of Corinth Excavations, The American School of Classical Studies at Athens (Greece)

Theodore Scaltsas, Professor of Ancient Greek Philosophy, University of Edinburgh (UK)

Thomas F. Scanlon, Professor of Classics, University of California, Riverside (USA)

Bernhard Schmaltz, Prof. Dr. Archäologisches Institut der CAU, Kiel (Germany)

Rolf M. Schneider, Professor of Classical Archaeology, Ludwig-Maximilians- Universität München (Germany)

Peter Scholz, Professor of Ancient History and Culture, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

Christof Schuler, director, Commission for Ancient History and Epigraphy of the German Archaeological Institute, Munich (Germany)

Paul D. Scotton, Assoociate Professor Classical Archaeology and Classics, California State University Long Beach (USA)

Danuta Shanzer, Professor of Classics and Medieval Studies, The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Fellow of the Medieval Academy of America (USA)

James P. Sickinger, Associate Professor of Classics, Florida State University (USA)

Marilyn B. Skinner 
Professor of Classics, 
University of Arizona (USA)

Niall W. Slater, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Latin and Greek, Emory University (USA)

Peter M. Smith, Associate Professor of Classics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA)

Dr. Philip J. Smith, Research Associate in Classical Studies, McGill University (Canada)

Susan Kirkpatrick Smith Assistant Professor of Anthropology Kennesaw State University (USA)

Antony Snodgrass, Professor Emeritus of Classical Archaeology, University of Cambridge (UK)

Theodosia Stefanidou-Tiveriou, Professor of Classical Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece).

Andrew Stewart, Nicholas C. Petris Professor of Greek Studies, University of California, Berkeley (USA)

Oliver Stoll, Univ.-Prof. Dr., Alte Geschichte/ Ancient History,Universität Passau (Germany)

Richard Stoneman, Honorary Fellow, University of Exeter (England)

Ronald Stroud, Klio Distinguished Professor of Classical Languages and Literature Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley (USA)

Sarah Culpepper Stroup, Associate Professor of Classics, University of Washington (USA)

Nancy Sultan, Professor and Director, Greek & Roman Studies, Illinois Wesleyan University (USA)

David W. Tandy, Professor of Classics, University of Tennessee (USA)

James Tatum, Aaron Lawrence Professor of Classics, Dartmouth College

Martha C. Taylor, Associate Professor of Classics, Loyola College in Maryland

Petros Themelis, Professor Emeritus of Classical Archaeology, Athens (Greece)

Eberhard Thomas, Priv.-Doz. Dr.,Archäologisches Institut der Universität zu Köln (Germany)

Michalis Tiverios, Professor of Classical Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece)

Michael K. Toumazou, Professor of Classics, Davidson College (USA)

Stephen V. Tracy, Professor of Greek and Latin Emeritus, Ohio State University (USA)

Prof. Dr. Erich Trapp, Austrian Academy of Sciences/Vienna resp. University of Bonn (Germany)

Stephen M. Trzaskoma, Associate Professor of Classics, University of New Hampshire (USA)

Vasiliki Tsamakda, Professor of Christian Archaeology and Byzantine History of Art, University of Mainz (Germany)

Christopher Tuplin, Professor of Ancient History, University of Liverpool (UK)

Gretchen Umholtz, Lecturer, Classics and Art History, University of Massachusetts, Boston (USA)

Panos Valavanis, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of Athens (Greece)

Athanassios Vergados, Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics, Franklin & Marshall College, Lancaster, PA

Christina Vester, Assistant Professor of Classics, University of Waterloo (Canada)

Emmanuel Voutiras, Professor of Classical Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece)

Speros Vryonis, Jr., Alexander S. Onassis Professor (Emeritus) of Hellenic Civilization and Culture, New York University (USA)

Michael B. Walbank, Professor Emeritus of Greek, Latin & Ancient History, The University of Calgary (Canada)

Bonna D. Wescoat, Associate Professor, Art History and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, Emory University (USA)

E. Hector Williams, Professor of Classical Archaeology, University of British Columbia (Canada)

Roger J. A. Wilson, Professor of the Archaeology of the Roman Empire, and Director, Centre for the Study of Ancient Sicily, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

Engelbert Winter, Professor for Ancient History, University of Münster (Germany)

Timothy F. Winters, Ph.D. Alumni Assn. Distinguished Professor of Classics, Austin Peay State University (USA)

Michael Zahrnt, Professor für Alte Geschichte, Universität zu Köln (Germany)

Paul Zanker, Professor Emeritus of Classical Studies, University of Munich (Germany)

http://vardaraxios.wordpress.com/2009/05...edonizmot/

15-01-2011, 12:52 PM
Reply
IvoPaunov Offline
Senior Member
****

Posts: 344
Joined: Oct 2010
Reputation: 9

(15-01-2011, 12:13 PM)афион Wrote: Дали си свесен колку пати истите постови ги покажуваш???
Побарај ја книгата „Македонскиот империјализам„ од Елиот па научи нешто гркоманче.

-Странно повредуванье, особено като иде от устата на човек с ник "Афион"!Tuktuk0ni
(This post was last modified: 15-01-2011, 12:53 PM by IvoPaunov.)
15-01-2011, 12:52 PM
Reply
афион Offline
Posting Freak
*****

Posts: 2,509
Joined: Mar 2010
Reputation: 3

(15-01-2011, 12:52 PM)IvoPaunov Wrote:
(15-01-2011, 12:13 PM)афион Wrote: Дали си свесен колку пати истите постови ги покажуваш???
Побарај ја книгата „Македонскиот империјализам„ од Елиот па научи нешто гркоманче.

-Странно повредуванье, особено като иде от устата на човек с ник "Афион"!Tuktuk0ni

А тебе ти смета АФИОН?

Низ срцето на Македонија тече Вардар,а не Дунав...Нашиот бисер е Охрид, а не Јадран...Нашето наследство се патриотските песни, а не ТВ Пинк...Јас навивам за ПЕЛИСТЕР, а не за Ѕвезда...Слобода ми донесе мојот дедо,а не КПЈ...Македонија ја создаде Господ,а не Тито...МАКЕДОНИЈА е вечна, а Југославија е мртва!!

Makedonija


http://macedoniahistorydocuments.blogspo...-post.html
15-01-2011, 01:19 PM
Reply
IvoPaunov Offline
Senior Member
****

Posts: 344
Joined: Oct 2010
Reputation: 9

(15-01-2011, 01:19 PM)афион Wrote:
(15-01-2011, 12:52 PM)IvoPaunov Wrote: -Странно повредуванье, особено като иде от устата на човек с ник "Афион"!Tuktuk0ni

А тебе ти смета АФИОН?

-Имам предвид, че със сигурност думата "Афион" е от гръцки произход....
15-01-2011, 01:29 PM
Reply
афион Offline
Posting Freak
*****

Posts: 2,509
Joined: Mar 2010
Reputation: 3

Papaver somniferum ќе да е латински Icon_razz

Низ срцето на Македонија тече Вардар,а не Дунав...Нашиот бисер е Охрид, а не Јадран...Нашето наследство се патриотските песни, а не ТВ Пинк...Јас навивам за ПЕЛИСТЕР, а не за Ѕвезда...Слобода ми донесе мојот дедо,а не КПЈ...Македонија ја создаде Господ,а не Тито...МАКЕДОНИЈА е вечна, а Југославија е мртва!!

Makedonija


http://macedoniahistorydocuments.blogspo...-post.html
15-01-2011, 01:35 PM
Reply